Wikisnaps! We find what's interesting on Wikipedia, so you don't have to!

Jason Acuna, better known as "Wee-Man", is an American TV host and actor. He is one of the stars of Jackass on MTV and the host of NESN's skateboarding show 54321. Acuña has achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism, and is 4 ft 0.5 in tall. He is also a professional skateboarder. Born in Pisa, Italy, Acuña grew up in Torrance, California, and attended North High School. He was the subscription manager for the skateboard magazine Big Brother. His association with that magazine led him to become involved with the Jackass television series in 2001. Acuña's Jackass antics include skating as an Oompa-Loompa, kicking himself in the head (a feat accomplished with the aid of his dwarfen proportions), dressing as a king while rolling Johnny Knoxville down a staircase in a red carpet, doing deep-knee bends while holding NBA star Shaquille O'Neal on his back, and having Preston Lacy ask someone to help him with his bags, only to have Wee-Man pop out, causing Preston to give chase. In 2007, Acuña starred in the reality TV series Armed and Famous and in July 2007, Acuña appeared on TV as a host of MTV's Scarred Live. Acuña appeared on the first season of NBC's Celebrity Circus. In the fourth week of competition, he became the first contestant to receive a perfect score (a 10 point average). Acuña ended the season in third place. Acuña is an owner of a franchise store of the Chronic Tacos restaurant in Redondo Beach, California. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]





The Halabja poison gas attack occurred in the period of March 16–17, 1988, during the closing days of the Iran-Iraq War, when chemical weapons were used by the Iraqi government forces in the Kurdish town of Halabja in Iraqi Kurdistan. The attack instantly killed thousands of people (3,200-5,000 dead instantly) and injured 7,000-10,000, most of them civilians; thousands more died of complications, diseases, and birth defects in the years after the attack. The incident, which some define as an act of genocide, was as of 2010 the largest-scale chemical weapons attack directed against a civilian-populated area in history. The attack began early in the evening of March 16, 1988, following a series of indiscriminate conventional (rocket and napalm) attacks, when Iraqi MiG and Mirage aircraft began dropping chemical bombs on Halabja's residential areas, far from the besieged Iraqi army base on the outskirts of the town. According to regional Kurdish rebel commanders, Iraqi aircraft conducted up to 14 bombing sorties of seven to eight planes each; helicopters coordinating the operation were also seen. Eyewitnesses have told of clouds of smoke billowing upward "white, black and then yellow"', rising as a column about 150 feet (46 meters) in the air. Survivors said the gas at first scented with the smell of sweet apples; they said people died in a number of ways, suggesting a combination of toxic chemicals (some of the victims "just dropped dead" while others "died of laughing"; while still others took a few minutes to die, first "burning and blistering" or coughing up green vomit). It is believed that Iraqi forces used multiple chemical agents during the attack, including mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun and VX; some sources have also pointed to the blood agent hydrogen cyanide (most of the wounded taken to hospitals in the Iranian capital Tehran were suffering from mustard gas exposure). The first images after the attack were taken by Iranian journalists who later spread the pictures in Iranian newspapers - film of the atrocity was also shown worldwide via news programmes. Some of those first pictures were taken by Iranian photographer Kaveh Golestan. Recalling the scenes at Halabja, Kaveh described the scene to Guy Dinmore of the Financial Times. Kaveh was about eight kilometres outside Halabja with a military helicopter when the Iraqi MiG-23 fighter-bombers flew in. "It was not as big as a nuclear mushroom cloud, but several smaller ones: thick smoke," he said. He was shocked by the scenes on his arrival in the town, though he had seen gas attacks before during the brutal Iran-Iraq War. Ali Hasan al-Majid ("Chemical Ali") was condemned to death by hanging by an Iraqi court in January 2010, after being found guilty of orchestrating the Halabja massacre. He was executed on January 25th 2010. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]





The Cadillac Sixteen was a prototype of a stylish and high performance automobile first presented by Cadillac in 2003. The vehicle was equipped with a 32-valve V16 concept engine displacing 13.6 liters (~830 cu. in) and was mated to a four-speed electronically controlled automatic transmission driving the rear wheels. The engine featured fuel-saving Active Fuel Management technology, much improved from its notorious ancestor, debuting in 2004 on some 2005 GM models. On the Sixteen, it would seamlessly shut down twelve cylinders in light driving, eight during strenuous driving, and only awaken the entire engine under full acceleration. With this type of system, the engine was capable of 20 mpg Imperial under normal conditions. The engine was said to produce 1,000 horsepower (750 kW) using no form of forced induction. The car was conceptually related to the Cadillac V-16 of the 1930s. The actual design of the car was a combination of Cadillac's current "Art and Science" design theme and 1967 Cadillac Eldorado cues. Additional original design elements were provided by an in-house design competition led by GM Vice President Robert Lutz. The Sixteen has the Cadillac logo carved out of solid crystal on the steering wheel and a Bulgari clock on the dashboard. Although the Sixteen fell short (narrowly, by some accounts) of production approval, its legacy is alive in Cadillac's future product planning. The subsequent generation of Cadillac products, particularly the revised CTS, have incorporated elements of the Sixteen's design. A scaled-down version of the car, referred to as the ULS (Ultra Luxury Sedan) or XLS, with a standard V8 and an optional V12, has been rumored for production since 2005, and has neither been confirmed nor denied by General Motors. If built, it would compete with the Mercedes-Benz S-Class, the BMW 7-Series, the Audi A8, and the Jaguar XJ. Though it is unclear how much it will resemble the Sixteen, a new halo model Cadillac is earmarked for 2010. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]



Irukandji jellyfish are tiny and extremely venomous jellyfish that are found mostly near Australia, and which cause symptoms collectively known as Irukandji syndrome. Its size is roughly no larger than a centimeter cubed. There are two known species, Carukia barnesi and the recently discovered Malo kingi. The symptoms of Irukandji syndrome were first documented by Hugo Flecker in 1952 and named after the Irukandji people whose country stretches along the coastal strip north of Cairns, Queensland. The first-known of these jellyfish, Carukia barnesi, was identified in 1964 by Dr. Jack Barnes; in order to prove it was the cause of Irukandji syndrome, he captured the tiny jelly and stung himself, his son, and a life guard. The jellyfish is very small, with a bell about one centimeter wide and four tentacles, which range in length from just a few centimeters to up to 35 cm in length. The stingers (nematocysts) are in clumps, appearing as rings of small red dots around the bell and along the tentacles. Very little is known about the life cycle and venom of Irukandji jellyfish. This is partly because they are small and sufficiently fragile to require special handling and containment. Researchers conjecture that its venom possesses such potency to enable it to quickly stun its prey, which consists of small and fast fish. Judging from statistics, it is believed that the Irukandji syndrome may be produced by several species of jellyfish, but only Carukia barnesi and Malo kingi have so far been proven to cause the syndrome. Irukandji syndrome is produced by a very small amount of venom and includes severe pains at various parts of the body (typically excruciating muscle cramps in the arms and legs, severe pain in the back and kidneys, a burning sensation of the skin and face), headaches, nausea, restlessness, sweating, vomiting, high heart rate and blood pressure, and psychological phenomena (such as the feeling of impending death). The syndrome is in part caused by release of catecholamines. The venom contains a sodium channel modulator. The sting itself is only moderately irritating; the severe syndrome is delayed for 5–120 minutes (30 minutes on average). The symptoms may last from hours to several days, and victims usually require hospitalization. As with box jellyfish, vinegar will deactivate unfired nematocysts on the skin, but has no effect on the venom already in the body. Treatment is symptomatic, with antihistamines and anti-hypertensive drugs used to control inflammation and hypertension and intravenous opiates, such as morphine and fentanyl, to control the pain. Magnesium sulfate has been used to reduce pain and hypertension in Irukandji syndrome, although it has had no effect in other cases. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]



wikisnap.com is not affiliated with or endorsed by wikipedia. wikipedia and the wikipedia globe are registered trademarks of wikipedia.org.
article content reproduced in compliance with wikipedia's copyright policy and gnu free documentation license
view our privacy policy and terms of service here