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Krampus is a mythical creature recognized in Alpine countries. According to legend, Krampus accompanies St. Nicholas (Santa Claus) during the Christmas season, warning and punishing bad children, in contrast to St. Nicholas, who gives gifts to good children. When the Krampus finds a particularly naughty child, it stuffs the child in its sack and carries the frightened child away to its lair, presumably to devour for its Christmas dinner. In the Alpine regions, Krampus is represented as a beast like creature, generally demonic in appearance. Traditionally young men dress up as the Krampus in Austria, southern Bavaria and South Tyrol during the first week of December, particularly on the evening of 5 December, and roam the streets frightening children with rusty chains and bells. The history of the Krampus figure stretches back to pre-Christian Germanic traditions. He also shares characteristics with the satyrs of Greek mythology. The early Catholic Church discouraged celebrations based around the wild goat-like creatures, and during the Inquisition efforts were made to stamp them out. However, Krampus figures persisted, and by the 17th century Krampus had been incorporated into Christian winter celebrations by pairing him with St. Nicholas. In the 20th century, Austrian governments discouraged the practice. In the aftermath of the 1934 Austrian Civil War, the Krampus tradition was prohibited by the Dollfuss regime under the the Fatherland Front (Vaterlandische Front) and the Christian Social Party. Towards the end of the century, a popular resurgence of Krampus celebrations occurred and continues today. Although Krampus appears in many variations, most share some common physical characteristics. He is hairy, usually brown or black, and has the cloven hooves and horns of a goat. His long pointed tongue lolls out. Krampus carries chains, thought to symbolize the binding of the Devil by the Christian Church. He thrashes the chains for dramatic effect. The chains are sometimes accompanied with bells of various sizes. Of more pagan origins are the ruten, bundles of birch branches that Krampus carries and occasionally swats children with. Sometimes Krampus appears with a sack or a washtub strapped to his back; this is to cart off evil children for drowning, eating, or transport to Hell. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]

USS Intrepid (CV/CVA/CVS-11), also known as The Fighting "I", is one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during World War II for the United States Navy. She is the fourth US Navy ship to bear the name. Commissioned in August 1943, Intrepid participated in several campaigns in the Pacific Theater of Operations, most notably the Battle of Leyte Gulf. Decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, she was modernized and recommissioned in the early 1950s as an attack carrier (CVA), and then eventually became an antisubmarine carrier (CVS). In her second career, she served mainly in the Atlantic, but also participated in the Vietnam War. Her notable achievements include being the first US aircraft carrier to launch aircraft with steam catapults, and being the recovery ship for a Mercury and a Gemini space mission. Because of her prominent role in battle, she was nicknamed "the Fighting I", while her often ill-luck and the time spent in dry dock for repairs earned her the nickname "the Dry I". Decommissioned in 1974, in 1982 Intrepid became the foundation of the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum in New York City. Throughout the last several years, the Intrepid museum has operated a fund for the restoration, raising over $60 million to refit Intrepid, to improve its exhibits for visitors, and improve Pier 86. In early July 2006, it was announced that Intrepid would undergo renovations and repairs, along with Pier 86 itself. It closed on 1 October 2006, in preparation for its towing to Bayonne, New Jersey for repairs, and later Staten Island, New York for renovation and temporary docking. Intrepid made a D-Day "landing" on Staten Island, 6 June 2007, after being towed from a slip at Bayonne Dry Dock & Repair Corp. While in Staten Island, Intrepid underwent the next phase of her refurbishment, and received an $8 million interior renovation. Never-before-seen areas of the ship including the forecastle, general berthing quarters and the ship's machine shop will be opened to the public for the first time. The hangar deck will feature a new layout and design including new interactive exhibits. Total cost of the renovation was $120 million $55 million for the ship and $65 million for Pier 86. The carrier was towed back into place on the Hudson River on 2 October 2008 and reopened to the public on 8 November. Intrepid's motto upon setting sail was "In Mare In Coelo", which means "In the Sea In Heaven" or "On the Sea (and) In the Sky". [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]

The Cx4 Storm was developed to be used in conjunction with other Beretta semi-automatic pistols. For example, the magazines for the Beretta 92FS chambered in 9mm can be used in the Cx4 (also chambered in 9mm). This aids in a smaller loadout no longer needing to carry separate magazines for the rifle and handgun and adds redundancy, allowing a person to carry more ammunition without adding weight. The CX4 Storm includes a Picatinny rail that can be extended under the barrel by pushing in the sling button and pulling the rail out by a thumb tab. Each Storm also includes a side rail with two mounting screws, a second can be purchased along with a bottom rail from the manufacturer. The contoured bottom rail is designed to attach under the two side rails. A top rail can also be purchased and installed with a tool that comes with the carbine. Three screws and nuts attach it to the top of the carbine using a pre-drilled hole, allowing the user to use the rail as a template to tap two other holes hidden under a thin membrane of plastic. The correct size drill bit needed for attaching the top rail is not included with the rifle or the top rail kit and has to be purchased separately. A maximum of five Picatinny rails can be utilized using Beretta accessory kits, or the user can use the two present at purchase to attach a number of optics, grips, lights, lasers, bipods etc. This firearm was designed to be very adaptable to customization. In addition to being able to customize the Cx4 with accessories, it is one of only a few firearms with the ability to switch the safety, ejection port, and magazine release to the left side of the weapon to accommodate left-handed shooters. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]

Marvin John Heemeyer was an American welder and an automobile muffler repair shop owner. Angered over the outcome of a zoning dispute, he armored a Komatsu D355A bulldozer with layers of steel and used it on June 4, 2004, to demolish the town hall, a former judge's home, and other buildings in Granby, Colorado. The rampage ended when the bulldozer became immobilized. After a standoff with law enforcement agencies, Heemeyer committed suicide by gunshot. Heemeyer had been feuding with Granby officials, particularly over fines for violating city ordinances and a zoning dispute regarding a concrete factory constructed opposite to his muffler shop that caused his business to fail. In 2001, the zoning commission and the town's trustees approved the construction of a cement manufacturing plant. Heemeyer appealed the decisions unsuccessfully. For many years, Heemeyer had used the adjacent property as a way to get to his muffler shop. The plan for the cement plant blocked that access. In addition to the frustration engendered by this dispute over access, Heemeyer was fined $2,500 by the Granby government for various violations, including "junk cars on the property and not being hooked up to the sewer line". Heemeyer sought to cross 8 feet of the concrete plant's property to hook up with the sewer line. As a last measure, Heemeyer petitioned the city with his neighbors and friends, but to no avail. He could not function without the sewer line and the cooperation of the town. Soon, Heemeyer leased his business to a trash company and sold the property several months prior to the rampage. The new owners gave Heemeyer six months to leave, and it was apparently during this time that he began modifying his bulldozer. Heemeyer had bought a bulldozer two years before the incident with the intention of using it to build an alternative route to his muffler shop, but city officials rejected his request to build the road. Heemeyer complained the concrete plant dropped dust on his business, and also blocked access to his business. Notes found by investigators after the rampage indicate that the primary motivation for Heemeyer's bulldozer rampage was his fight to stop a concrete plant from being built near his shop. The notes indicated Heemeyer held grudges over the zoning approval. "I was always willing to be reasonable until I had to be unreasonable", Heemeyer wrote. "Sometimes reasonable men must do unreasonable things." Afterwards, the modified bulldozer came to be known as "Killdozer", although only Heemeyer was killed in the incident. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE] is not affiliated with or endorsed by wikipedia. wikipedia and the wikipedia globe are registered trademarks of
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