Hubble Ultra Deep Field

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The Hubble Ultra Deep Field, or HUDF, is an image of a small region of space in the constellation Fornax, composited from Hubble Space Telescope data accumulated over a period from September 24, 2003 through to January 16, 2004. It is the deepest image of the universe ever taken by humans, looking back approximately 13 billion years, and it will be used to search for galaxies that existed between 400 and 800 million years after the Big Bang. The HUDF image was taken in a section of the sky with a low density of bright stars in the near-field, allowing much better viewing of dimmer, more distant objects. The image contains an estimated 10,000 galaxies. Located southwest of Orion in the Southern-Hemisphere constellation Fornax, the image covers 11.0 square arcminutes. This is just one-tenth the diameter of the full moon as viewed from Earth, smaller than a 1 mm by 1 mm square of paper held 1 meter away, and equal to roughly one thirteen-millionth of the total area of the sky. The image is oriented so that the upper left corner points toward north (-46.4) on the celestial sphere. The HUDF remains the deepest view of the universe until the release of data from the Deep Field observation underway by the Hubble Space Telescope after its 2009 refurbishing. Deep Field observations are also planned for the James Webb Space Telescope in 2014. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]





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